Your Mission

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    Your Mission

     

     

     

     

    If you decide that you want to do this kind of work. You need to ask yourself, “What is your mission?” Why do you want to do this? What sort of superhero do you want to be? In the world of fictional superheroes they come in 3 types. The Hero, the Anti-Hero and the Vigilante. My friend Blackmage summed up the difference better than anyone I know. Here is a quote by him.

     

    “-The Hero focuses on stopping crime first and addressing evil second while following the law.

    -The
    Antihero focuses on stopping crime and stopping evil alike. He is willing to bend the law to accomplish his task.

    -The
    Vigilante focuses on stopping evil first and addressing crime second and is willing to break the law.


    The Hero strives to inspire, to be accountable to those he serves, and embraces the responsibility that comes with his position. (
    The Superman Method)


    The Antihero creates apprehension in those he opposes and inspires those that he has served and saved directly. He lacks accountability but embraces the responsibility of his position. (
    The Batman Method)


    The Vigilante is terror. He exists as the necessary evil existing to rival the evil that he combats. He cares not about accountability or responsibility. This is a path that he has no choice but to travel. He is the warring angel in the bowels of hell. (
    The Punisher Method)”

    In real life choosing to try and become either an anti-hero like Batman or a vigilante like the Punisher will end only two ways, prison or death. Even trying to be a hero can have fatal consequences, but of the three it is the only path I recommend you choose. Always obey the law and remember that it is the job of the police to enforce the laws, not yours. You are not a replacement for the police, but you could be a great help to them by being an extra set of eyes and ears for them.

     

    I have had people compare me to Rorschach of the Watchmen, but I am in every way his opposite. In both cases our mask is our whole costume, but that is pretty much where any resemblance ends. Both Alan Moore who created Rorschach and I based our characters on the old pulp fiction characters which is why we look similar. In Alan Moore's fictional “Watchmen” Rorschach begins his career seeking to be a hero, but swiftly chooses to become an anti-hero and then much later he descends even further into becoming a vigilante. Even in the fictional story he ends up in prison and later dies.

     

     

     

    I have met many young rlsh's who dream of being a violent vigilante like the Punisher. So what is wrong with just killing criminals? Here are 2 examples of two different groups in history who decided to put on masks and take the law into their own hands.

     

     

    Masked Vigilantes

     

    I don't think we can escape mentioning the early Klu Klux Klan who saw themselves as masked crusaders and heroes. Truthfully there has never been a villain in history who did not see himself as a hero. They donned masks and costumes and created a vigilante organization that they saw as heroic.

    (From Wikipedia)

    The first Klan flourished in the Southern United States in the late 1860s, then died out by the early 1870s. It sought to overthrow the Republican state governments in the South during the Reconstruction Era, especially by using violence against African leaders. With numerous chapters across the South, it was suppressed around 1871, through federal law enforcement. Members made their own, often colorful, costumes: robes, masks, and conical hats, designed to be terrifying, and to hide their identities.”



    I wanted to discuss this subject to point out that being a Vigilante is never a good thing. Yet I meet young people on line every day who are ready to become real life versions of DC's Rorschach, from the Watchman or “V” from “V for Vendetta, also created by writer Alan Moore or Marvel Comics, The Punisher. Most are all talk of course and few there are who ever leave their bedrooms. One of the purposes of this book is to discourage anyone from taking the law into their own hands. It can only end in imprisonment or death.



    Another example of masked vigilantes in history is the group that called themselves the “Bald Knobbers”. Here is an edited article about them from wikipedia...

    The Bald Knobbers”



    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    The Bald Knobbers were a group of vigilantes in the Ozark region of southwest Missouri from 1883 to 1889. They are commonly depicted wearing black horned hoods with white outlines of faces painted on them, a distinction that evolved during the rapid proliferation of the group into neighboring counties from its Taney County origins. The group got its name from the grassy bald knob summits of the nearby Ozark Mountains. The hill where they first met, Snapp's Bald, is located just north of Kirbyville, Missouri An article in the October 5, 1898 issue of Spirigfield, Missouri's The Leader-Democrat states:

     

    “Henry Westmoreland is in from Beaver County, Oklahoma, which was formerly a part of the strip known as No-Man's-Land and was the man who gave that organization its name.”

     

     

    The Bald Knobbers, who for the most part had sided with the North in the American Civil War, were opposed by the Anti-Bald Knobbers, who for the most part had sided with the Confederates. Hernando summarizes their political role:

     

    They began as a group dedicated to protecting life and property, aiding law enforcement officials in the apprehension of criminals, opposing corruption in local government, and punishing those who violated the social and religious mores of their community.

     

    In some places, the vigilantes gained much political influence, occupied key offices, and became effectively the ruling faction in local politics. They made many enemies, however, with whom they had several violent, sometimes fatal, confrontations.

     

    The Bald Knobbers initially set out to put an end to the marauding gangs of outlaws but the Bald Knobbers were to end up having their own excesses and criminal activities.

     

     

    The Taney County chapter

    In 1883, thirteen men led by Nat N. Kinney formed the group, in retaliation against the hordes of invading marauders that had plagued the area since the start of the Reconstruction Era.

    During the period of 1865-1882, over thirty murders were committed, none leading to a conviction. The group was called both the "Citizen's Committee" and "The Law and Order League" by its members.

    However, because their secret meetings were held atop a "bald" mountaintop (in order to keep a lookout for spies), the public began to refer to them as the Bald Knobbers. As their numbers grew into the hundreds, out of a county of only 7,000 people, the original intent began to lose focus.

    Though initially praised for driving out the notorious outlaws, public sentiment soon turned against them.

    Although the men initially wore nothing more than a simple kerchief over their lower faces, if any disguise at all, many soon adopted a simple white muslin hood with corners tied off like ears, and cut out eye and mouth holes. This fearsome appearance only inflamed the anti-sentiment, peaking with the formation of the anti-Bald Knobbers.

    While the Bald Knobbers were mostly Republicans that had fought for the Union Army, most of the anti-Bald Knobbers were Democrats who had supported the Confederacy. When the county courthouse burned down, both rival sides pointed fingers at each other, intensifying the bitterness between the groups. Though their opponents could never agree upon a proper means of dissolving the Bald Knobbers, they did succeed in petitioning the Missouri Governor to send an Adjutant General to Forsyth to investigate.the situation. Upon arrival, although the representative was pleased to see the atmosphere of order that prevailed, he recommended to Kinney that an official dissolution of the Bald Knobbers would be in the best interest of the county. That next day a formal dissolution ceremony was held in the town square where the Bald Knobbers were publicly disbanded, having served their original purpose.



    The Christian County chapter

    Neighboring counties such as Christian, Douglas, Greene and Stone had already adopted the idea of masked night riders, and disregarded the strict rules that had governed the original Taney county chapter.

    The Christian County group became the most notorious by far. At the time Chadwick was the most bustling town of Christian County due to the nearby railroad, and a prime market for timber made into railroad ties. However, Chadwick's design as a "railroad town" meant that saloons and brothels dominated the area, and led many men to gamble, drink, and whore away their week's earnings.

    In a move towards moral straightening, the Christian County group held meetings at a large cave on the edge of the Walker's land, and the members wore black hoods with cork or wooden horns protruding out of the top, decoratively designed with white or red stripes around the eyes, mouth, and horns, and

    sometimes with tassels dangling off the horn points. The members also routinely burned down saloons, and were generally more threatening than the Taney County group had been.

    William Edens was a young opponent of the group, and would publicly criticize them. After he received several warnings (including a late-night beating), tragedy struck. The night of March 11, 1887, the Christian County group met at the cave to discuss disbanding.

    However, that night new members were inducted, and several members were incensed by new remarks William Edens had made about the band. As the meeting finished, many of the younger men headed home the long way, towards the Edens' cabin. Captain David Walker pleaded with them not to go, but his son Billy and several others, including Wiley Mathews, were headstrong.

    When the men discovered that Edens was not home, they continued up the road to the cabin of James and Elizabeth Edens, William's parents. The Bald-Knobbers busted in the windows and splintered in the doors of the tiny cabin, spraying shotgun blasts as they intruded. In the gunshot exchange, William Edens and Charles Green were killed, James Edens seriously wounded from an axe blow to the head and Bald Knobbers William Walker and John Mathews shot. The wails of the women and children led neighbors to the scene of the massacre. First to arrive was Charles Green's father, George Green, who lived near enough to hear the shots.



    Though Dave Walker had attempted to prevent the men in his group from letting their actions escalate, his very presence in the nearby road at the time of the attack ultimately doomed him. After 80 men were indicted and tried in a series of worldwide-media covered trials over the course of the next 18 months, it was ultimately decided that four would hang for the crimes: Dave Walker, his young son Billy, Deacon John Mathews and his nephew Wiley Mathews. Wiley would later escape the county's new jail, leaving the three others to be punished for the reign of the vigilantes.

    The execution date came to bear on May 10, 1889. After a late night of prayer services and repentance, the next morning the three men were led out into an enclosed area and onto a scaffolding the sheriff built himself, despite not having any prior hanging experience in executing prisoners. After last-minute prayers and final goodbyes between a father and son, the trap was sprung. Onlookers watched the three men twist and writhe on ropes that were too long. The condemned men's feet dragged along the ground, and at one point young Billy's rope broke, leaving him writhing on the ground and calling out for help. He was re-hanged, and after thirty-four minutes, the last of them finally died. Public criticism of the botched executions ran rampant.”

     



    Knight-Hood speaking. Now this group was clearly influenced by the Russell Thorndike hero the Scarecrow, who was himself the leader of a group of masked vigilantes who blatantly broke the law in favor of their own moral code of right and wrong.

    This is a classic example in history of why vigilantism simply DOES NOT WORK !



    BECAUSE EVERYONE has their OWN code of RIGHT and WRONG and to go out and “punish” anyone who does not follow your own personal code makes you the outlaw and you the villain.

    Not to mention you will not only have the criminal world out trying to find you but also the police force. The murder of a criminal is still murder and make you the criminal and that is what is wrong with it.



    Once again the Bald Knobbers, like the KKK saw themselves as heroes, not villains and a more perfect example of how this can only end in tragedy could not be found than in these two masked vigilante groups.



    Knight-Hood